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US Lawmakers Decided To Restore Privacy Rules For ISP User Data Selling

By Jaden Jane | Mar 29, 2017 11:25 PM EDT

After debates, US lawmakers finally decided to roll back ISP rules. The rules will block data selling to third parties for privacy protections.

Inquirer reported that from last week's vote of 50-48 from the Senate, the House of Representatives last Tuesday voted for 215-2015 which outrun the Senate's votes. At some point, though there are final votes, it has been also followed by fierce debate for digital privacy protection against the rule requiring for permission before ISP sells digital data to third parties.

The overturned rule from the Federal Communications Commission or FFC was sent to the President's office for signing, according to PressTV. The ISP rules were passed last October 2016 while President Obama is still in position under the US Freedom Act.

President Donald Trump is said to be in great support to repeal the act of preventing Internet Service Providers or ISP from selling users' data to third parties even without people's consent. However, the Republicans claim that the rules are very confusing for it only cover ISP's and not website companies such as Facebook and Google.

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Some legislators believe that ISP selling of user's data without consent is obviously a violation of online privacy. This particularly happened with the Central Intelligence Agency and National Security Agency which have been accused of gathering personal information from social networking sites worldwide.

Republican senators and Democratic house leader Nancy Pelosi are in separate believes over the issue of canceling the new privacy rules for Internet Service Providers (ISP). Pelosi opposed that Americans should be given enough shred of privacy when they go online. Republicans want private information of the people to be sold online even without permission

Greg Walden, the Republican Representative confirmed that the bill to block ISP from selling user's data without permission would roll back. The White House further confirmed its support for the move, "the rule departs from the technology-neutral framework for online privacy."

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