Nav

SpaceX Dragon Capsule Arrives Successfully For Its 11th Cargo Mission To ISS

By Cristina Limpiada | Jun 06, 2017 11:28 AM EDT

The SpaceX Dragon capsule successfully arrived at the International Space Station yesterday. The old Dragon capsule was the first reused capsule for the 11th cargo mission and the first repeat delivery.

Space.com reported the successful arrival of the reused SpaceX Dragon capsule at the International Space Station yesterday. The launching was set on Saturday (June 3) from NASA Kennedy Space Center, Florida and after two days, the SpaceX Dragon arrives at the ISS with packed of supplies and science experiments at around 6,000 lbs. or nearly 2,700 kilograms.

According to Phys.org, the SpaceX Dragon capsule was launched at the top of the recycled Falcon 9 for its 11th cargo mission. NASA television was able to capture live images of the event up until the Dragon capsule was grabbed by the robotic arm of the ISS at exactly 9:52 am (1352 GMT).

Watch video

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson operated the robotic arm from the station and grabs the first US spaceship to return to the ISS since 2011. To recall, the American space shuttle program has ended in 2011, and the SpaceX Dragon capsule's mission is considered as the first repeat delivery from the US.

Afterward, the NASA's crew to control the mission in Houston will then operate the ISS's robotic arm to install the SpaceX Dragon capsule to its docking port. The mission is considered the 11th cargo mission of SpaceX with NASA based on their $1.6 billion contracts. The Dragon is also a reused capsule from the fourth cargo mission in 2014 where it had splashed down in the Pacific Ocean.

Right after the capture was confirmed, NASA astronaut Jack Fischer said, "These people have supplied us with a vast amount of science and supplies, really fuel for the engine and innovation we get to call home, the International Space Station." For both Fischer and Whitson, the SpaceX Dragon capsule is such a big help for new studies and for them who used to live in the ISS. The SpaceX Dragon is scheduled to splash in the Pacific Ocean next month to return hardware, supplies and science discoveries.

Latest Stories