Dec 10, 2018 | Updated: 09:37 PM EST

T-Mobile's Data Cap Before Throttling is Not at 28GB; Fair Usage Commitment Says It's a Bit More

Mar 13, 2017 12:40 AM EDT

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T-Mobile raises the threshold from 28GB to 30GB of data per billing period before throttling the internet connection. The US carrier announced earlier that costumers who consume more than 28GB data per month will be deprioritized. However, there is a conflicting information in their official website that increases the limit.

There is no adverts nor announcement regarding the increased threshold. But then, the Fair Usage Commitment on the official website indicates the subtle change to 30GB per month. It also discussed how T-Mobile One was designed to be used for mobile hotspot or tethering. Meaning, the company caters smartphones and tablets but not as a replacement for the broadband internet where multiple connections are needed.

There are debates about throttling and some users argue that they bought an unlimited plan and slower speed means otherwise. However, the Federal Communications Commission supports T-Mobile and other carriers regarding data throttling. FCC stressed that companies are aiming to achieve decent internet service in a way that is fair to every customer.

To ensure that everybody can enjoy uninterrupted connection at best speed, T-Mobile will contact those who fall on top 3 percent of data users. This is to discuss the possible options for increasing the data limit before throttling or upgrade limitations of a plan. The carrier will also suspend or terminate the service if heavy data users are affecting the allocated data to other customers.

To compare T-Mobile's data limit, competitors AT&T and Verizon are offering 22GB of data before throttling. Another carrier, Sprint, has 23GB data allocation before they eventually slow down the connection. A difference of 7GB data means at least 280 hours of regular internet browsing.

Even if a customer breached 30GB of his data allocation, throttling may not really affect those who live in uncongested areas. Data throttling takes effect in a way that affected costumers are placed below everybody else in the network. In an urban area where there are too many T-Mobile connections being on the bottom means slower speed.

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