Jul 23, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

Black Hole Photo Can Be Captured For The First Time Using Event Horizon Telescope

Mar 28, 2017 02:23 AM EDT

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The black hole will not be a product of everyone's imagination. A recently developed Event Horizon Telescope is ready to take pictures.

Engadget reported a new success in astronomy when the Event Horizon Telescope or EHT was invented. The telescope will be set on a mission to capture for the first time the photos of a black hole. The Event Horizon Telescope was a success, after two decades of development the virtual telescope is now ready to peer with the supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy.

According to BBC, the Event Horizon Telescope is an Earth-sized virtual telescope that can link a huge amount of radio receivers. The first photo of the black hole is scheduled to be taken from April 5th to April 14th this year. The black hole is commonly referred to as Sagittarius A* which has been influencing the galaxy ever since.

With the Event Horizon Telescope, the Sagittarius A* will be seen as a tiny object in the sky before a photo will be captured. The black hole has a distance of 26,000 light-years from Earth.

The virtual telescope has an array that covers from the South Pole, going to Hawaii, to the Americas and finally to Europe. Astronomers will use a technique called very-long-baseline interferometry to turn all observatories into one telescope that top-view the Earth.

According to the team of Event Horizon Telescope, viewing the black hole using the telescope is like looking at a DVD on the moon from Earth. Aside from the virtual telescope, the team has their atomic clocks and huge storage capacities hard drives that can match the total storage capacity of 10,000 laptops.

As planned, after the data such as photos and videos were captured, the hard drives will be carried out to MIT Haystack Observatory to drive the data from the Event Horizon Telescope. However, researchers claim that the process will be long and will take up to next year before the photo of the black hole will be finally released.

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