May 26, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

Recycled SpaceX Booster: US Air Force Space Planned For The Next Military Space Program

Apr 07, 2017 05:34 AM EDT

The idea of using reusable vehicle is decided a week ago after SpaceX launched a communication satellite. However, this program used a refurbished Falcon 9 booster that previously used in NASA’s cargo ship mission.

After sending cargo resupply at NASA’s designated orbit, SpaceX successfully recovered their main stage rocket Booster of Falcon 9 Engine. Moreover, this reusable booster recovered after successful return landing on an Ocean based Platform last April during its maiden flight.

After that, this first stage SpaceX booster re-launched and making the first spaceflight. Therefore, it was salvaged again last Thursday. According to Reuter, General John "Jay" Raymond told, he would be comfortable if they were to fly on a reused booster.

According to a new report in the Deccan chronicle, SpaceX has got three contacts to launch military and national security satellites. Previously they have got a Space launch partnership proposal in United Launch Alliance with Lockheed Martin and Boeing.

As per SpaceX CEO Elon musk, they have planned to fly about 20 more rockets this year. Additionally, they also have a plan for fight debut of a heavy-lift rocket. Up to six of those missions, they will use reusable falcon booster.

During an interview in U.S. Space Symposium, SpaceX President Gwynne Shotwell said that reusable booster significantly cost-effective. As the cost of refurbishment of Falcon 9 booster is substantially less than half of the new booster. Falcon Booster is most expensive part and costs around 62 million$ for basic falcon launch, according to SpaceX website.

For further cost effectiveness now SpaceX have a new goal to launch and return a rocket booster within 24 hours. However, Raymond said that Air force needs a safety certification from higher command. For that, they need to confirm that a reused booster is truly safe to deliver its satellites into orbit.

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