Aug 15, 2018 | Updated: 01:42 PM EDT

Bubbling Phenomena of Liquid Gas May Have Its Roots in Physics; Researchers Observe

Apr 12, 2017 04:55 PM EDT

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The bubbling phenomena of liquid gasses was a long observed characteristic of gaseous being among scientists. However, despite a major number of studies, researchers were unable to crack down the real and absolute reason behind this development. Perhaps, a new research may have finally clinched some potential answers for this state of the gas. As per a number of newest insights, the realm of physics may have the answer to this bubbling nature.

According to Phys, the researchers' team from Zhejiang University's State Key Laboratory of Fluid Power and Mechatronic Systems, situated in Hangzhou, China has discovered a new sort of bubbling feature submerged in gas-liquid which were seen in an immersion lithography machine. This took place in microchannels where the gas-liquid jets. This caused vibration which damaged exposure quality. The group was even stunned with the fact this bubbling generated some unique characteristics like the interval in its intensity, irregular rotational phenomena, and special bifurcation.

As per a report by EurekaAlert, the group even predicted that this vibration may also have implications of other motions of Physics. According to them, this can happen due to mass or heat transfer enhancement and bubble motion control. However, this discovery has now been a great innovation for answering the long-thought question of why and how bubbles get detached from nozzles and eventually go up in the gaseous fluid.

Bubble motion has been addressed as a great extension of the particulars of physics. Liang Hu, an associate professor who works in the State Key Lab remarked in this regard "In the usual sense, bubbles detach from the nozzle one by one, driven by buoyancy, and rise vertically in a single chain." The study is said to inaugurate new ways for the ultimate understanding of other structures and characteristics of the various gas.

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