Jan 23, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

From Drought To Flood, California Swings Between Extreme Weathers

Apr 14, 2017 02:08 AM EDT

An extreme drought-to-deluge climate swing is sweeping California like never before. Weather experts are worried about the fact that this weather swing might lead to devastating droughts and floods in the future for the state of California.

According to the Los Angeles Times, the current year is going to be the wettest winter experienced by the Sierra Nevada situated in the north of California in nearly a century's time. This is significant for the mountain range that supplies large amounts of water for the state of California. Experts take this to be a very significant sign for a state which was experiencing record-breaking dry conditions just two years ago.

Reportedly, the shift in temperature has coincided with an increase in temperatures in California that began in 1980. Experts say that the rising global temperatures can have a remarkable effect on weather patterns across the planet. They also say that it is the change in the warmth of the ocean that ultimately decides how much rain the state of California will be getting.

The warming effects of the weather have worsened the most recent scenario of a five-year drought, including the driest four-year period in terms of California state record. 2014. 2015 and 2016 were recorded as the first, second and third hottest years in the history of the state, say the experts. This hot weather is also having a huge impact on the water supply required by the state of California to survive.

According to KTLA News, a new series of late season storms are going to torment the state of California starting as early as this week. This is another reason why the state might experience the wettest winter ever this very year.

California, however, seems to be up and ready for the challenge. The state authorities have made sure that almost all the reservoirs are full and healthy in term of water. In case drought strikes California, these reservoirs will be enough to survive through the dry period, opine the state authorities.  

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