Mar 17, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

Atacama Desert Holds Secrets Of 'Life On Mars': Specialists From NASA Use Chemical Laptop

Apr 23, 2017 12:19 PM EDT

Few spots are as threatening to life as Chile's the Atacama Desert. It's the driest non-polar desert on Earth, and just the hardiest microorganisms get by there. Its rough scene has lain undisturbed for ages, presented to outrageous temperatures and radiation from the sun. It is said that if life is being found here in the Atacama Desert, then it might be possible for finding life on the surface of Mars, which is even harsher.

According to, a group of specialists from NASA and a few universities went by the Atacama Desert in February. They burned through 10 days testing gadgets that might one be able to be utilized to scan for indications of life on the other planets. That gathering incorporated a group from NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, chipping away at a portable science lab called the Chemical Laptop.

The Chemical Laptop which was used at the Atacama Desert has the capability to check for amino acids with even just a small drop of the water sample. Amino acids are known to be the building block of life and are widespread in the solar system. The fluid based examination strategies have been appeared to be orders of magnitude more delicate than gas-based techniques for similar sorts of tests.

NASA reported that the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has also designed a technology which is a subcritical water extractor. This water extractor will be acting as the "front end" of the laptop. With the help of this extractor, amino acids will be released by the soil sample with water mixing in it, which can be further analyzed by the Chemical Laptop. This technique will be used for finding life in the Atacama Desert.

The close term objective is to coordinate the extractor and Chemical Laptop into a solitary, mechanized gadget. It would be tried amid future field crusades to the Atacama Desert with a group of scientists drove by Brian Glass of NASA's Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California.

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