Dec 12, 2017 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

Atlas of Submarine Glacial Landforms Uncover the Movement of Iceberg in Antarctica and Climate History

Apr 26, 2017 03:13 PM EDT

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Hundreds of scientists have worked on the atlas to provide the most comprehensive view of the seabed in Antarctica over time. The atlas of submarine glacial landforms has given data about the trace of the iceberg movement for years.

The atlas is presented in the General Assembly of the European Geosciences Union (EGU) in Vienna this week. Dr.Kelly Hogan, from the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) presented the atlas as reported by BBC. Dr. Hogan is one of the editors of the atlas of submarine glacial landforms who worked together with her colleagues to collect the images.

"We can see where the ice has been and what it's done," Dr. Hogan said explaining the atlas of submarine glacial landforms. "Looking at what has happened in the past can help us understand what may happen in the future with modern ice sheets as they respond to climate change."

The atlas of submarine glacial landforms is collected in four years with the new geophysical technique, including multibeam echo sounding and 3D seismic. The mapping technique is a revolution in the high-resolution imaging for modern seafloor and palaeo-shelf surfaces in Arctic and Antarctic waters according to British Antarctic Survey. The techniques enable the vast quantities of data and insight into the sedimentary architecture to be collected, as well as the past environmental condition of the Arctic sea floor in the atlas of submarine glacial landforms.

In order to make a 618-page-atlas, 250 scientists from 20 countries work together to make the atlas of submarine glacial landforms. The atlas mostly contains the image taken by the echosounder from ships that sent the pulse to the ocean bed. The return signal from the pulse is a depth map of the ocean bed, that looks like a picture taken from high latitudes. Watch the footage of the British Antarctic Survey at work in the Antarctic below:

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