Feb 21, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

Humans Can Talk To Dolphins In 2021 Using AI Technology

May 11, 2017 12:58 PM EDT

Human languages spoken by every country around the world can be understood using artificial intelligence technology. But scientists are taking AI in an unusual twist as they try to employ the technology in breaking the dolphin's language barrier. This might also happen sooner than anyone expects as the timeline is already set in 2021.

A Swedish-based startup group called Gavagai AB is currently working on an AI that might translate the dolphin chatter someday. The language processing technology is advancing at an impressive pace and Gavagai AB is keen on gathering "dolphin language" data. The project is already running for four years and the team ruled that understanding what the dolphins are saying is possible, Digital Trends reported.

Theoretically, dolphins are using the same linguistic processes to that of humans. They communicate with words being compounded into a sentence. They also pause to give the other dolphin a time to respond. If so, AI can draw links between sounds, the same case with any other human language, Futurism said.

Here is another interesting theory: the AI that translates dolphin language can reverse-engineer to allow humans speak back. The team believes that by 2021, they may already breach the secrets behind the dolphin language. Any finding might prove useful not only for AI practitioners but zoologists as well.

Another potential use is for the Navy who recruits dolphins in rescuing lost swimmers. This seemingly absurd feat was done before, save for the absence of a direct communication line through AI. In a nutshell, the Navy can communicate with dolphins for a target-specific task.

Meanwhile, Gavagai AB head Lars Hamberg is in the Silicon Valley to convince investors about injecting a capital in the AI technology. Hamberg stressed that Gavagai AB has already outperformed their rivals, as plainly perceived through their benchmark. Hamberg claims that Gavagai AI has spent $9 million for the project that is already translating 45 languages in an "industrial level.

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