Oct 16, 2018 | Updated: 04:34 PM EDT

SpaceX, U.S. Air Force Will Launch The Mysterious X-37B Spaceplane Using Falcon 9

Jun 08, 2017 11:38 AM EDT

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SpaceX and U.S. Air Force partnership is inevitable to launch the first unscrewed mission of the mysterious X-37B. The secret military spacecraft will be launched using the Falcon 9 rocket.

Tech Crunch reported that SpaceX had already settled its contract with the U.S. Air Force for the first-time unscrewed mission of the X-37B spaceplane. However, the purpose of the mission for the military spacecraft is kept secret.

The U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee, Secretary Heather Wilson confirmed that the X-37B spaceplane of the U.S Air Force will be launched in August atop of the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket. According to Popular Mechanics, the U.S. Air Force has chosen SpaceX for the launching of its fifth mysterious X-37B mission spaceplane due to the ongoing successes of its recent rockets and cargo capsules.

Wilson said that it's the same model of the U.S. Air Force's X-37B spaceplane that is going up again. He also added, "It's a reusable vehicle and will be going up again on top of SpaceX Falcon 9 launcher in August."

The X-37B spaceplane just got back last month to Earth from its last mission in space where it had carried secretive payloads to orbit in 718 days. The U.S. Air Force's owned X-37B spaceplane is built by Boeing and is called the Orbital Test Vehicle for it launches in a vertical direction and lands like a traditional plane.

However, the X-37B is a lot smaller compared to Space Shuttle but with similar size. Previously, the U.S. Air Force chose United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket for its launching and it's a switch to the upgraded Falcon 9 rocket. This means that Pentagon has put immense trust in SpaceX for the launching and chance to deliver its important payloads to orbit.

To make the launching successful, an upgraded SpaceX Falcon 9 or Full Thrust will be used instead of the previous versions. Hopefully, SpaceX will safely launch the X-37B spaceplane of the U.S. Air Force to continue the government's trust for future missions.

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