Apr 19, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

A Closer Look On Climate Change "Wild Card"

Sep 09, 2015 07:01 PM EDT

The Climate Change and Global Warming have been happening progressively over the years. We have been continuously reminded of the Earth's decline as the result of our progressive, developmental technology and harboring of our planet's resources.

Over the past 100 years, the average temperature of the Earth has risen between 0.4 to 0.8 degrees Celsius. This change has been attributed mostly to increase the level of carbon dioxide, fossil fuel burning, agriculture and other human activities. This resulted to most of the Earth's significant changes on the land and sea, especially on the climate and temperature.

Recently, studies have shown the there will be a significant increase on the sea water level due to the disturbance of the sea water current. The ice is melting from various regions, like Greenland, so the freshwater on the sea, significantly on the Atlantic would mix with this.

The issue as per research is that even if it would cold water, which would usually sink, the salt level of the fresh water is less than that of the sea, making it rise on the surface which would disrupt the normal flow of the water in the sea. The cold water usually is more dense than warm, so at the sea it normally sinks. However, the flow of the freshwater from the melting of ice could slow or even cut the circulation. This could result to a bigger problem that the whole world would be served.

While the theory of what's going to happen could be similar of that of the movie "The Day After Tomorrow", scientists assured that it would not be precisely true. The new research said that at most, the consequence of these events would be as much as the rise of the U.S. sea level which could unfortunately after Boston and New York.

The study found that the reconstruction and changes on the sea surface temperature had started in the 70's, that the circulation has already been vulnerable due to traveling of sea ice out of the Arctic ocean, melting to freshwater to the sea. 

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