Dec 07, 2016 | Updated: 09:37 AM EST

United States Reveal New Dietary Guideline

Jan 18, 2016 12:07 AM EST

The United States Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and the Department of Agriculture (USDA) has jointly released the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The new guideline is not largely different from the previous one released two years ago, albeit this guideline has more focus on the risks of sugar and salt in everyday diet.

Like Us on Facebook

The previous dietary guideline issued by the United States government had warnings on high cholesterol diet that can lead to obesity and type two diabetes. The new guideline still has these warnings, but with additional iteration of the risks of sugar and salt in the American diet.

The guidelines also emphasize healthy eating patterns, rather than individually focusing on nutrients or foods. Maintaining body weight is also included in the guideline through "nutrient adequacy". This could easily mean that fad diets should strictly be avoided and sustainable healthy pattern is much more preferred.

Dr. Richard Wender of the American Cancer Society criticized the guideline because it ignores extensive science on s link between cancer and diet involving red meat consumption.

"By omitting specific diet recommendations, such as eating less red and processed meat, these guidelines miss a critical and significant opportunity to reduce suffering and death from cancer," Dr. Wender said.

The guideline recommends lean meat as part of a healthy diet. However, further reading into the guideline, it also emphasizes eating more vegetables and eating less meat for teenage boys and adult men.

The United States Congress got heavily involved in creating the guideline. The Congress encouraged to drop the recommendations based on environmental impact, albeit, unable to come up with new standards for the guidelines to use scientifically.

"It's clear to me and my colleagues that the administration wisely listened to the science and dismissed the interests of political activists," said Alabama Rep. Robert Aderholt, the Republican chairman of the subcommittee that oversees Agriculture Department spending.

©2015 ScienceTimes.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission. The window to the world of science times.

Popular Stories

Recommended Stories