Genetics

Clearing the Questions Around PTSD—How Researchers Revealed a New Genetic Link

Medicine & Technology It’s a story not too unfamiliar in the line of duty for those in the armed forces. When faced with the traumatic experiences, dangers and death of warring nations, often those on the front line are scathed to say the least. A new study revealing the origins and genetic markers for Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may provide a glimmer of hope for soldiers suffering with the condition, but with the stigma and disbelief the general public has regarding the disorder, the battle is far from over.

Clearing the Questions Around PTSD—Why New Research Revealing Genetic Markers is the Discovery of a Lifetime

It’s a story not too unfamiliar in the line of duty for those in the armed forces. When faced with the traumatic experiences, dangers and death of warring nations, often those on the front line are scathed to say the least. A new study revealing the origins and genetic markers for Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may provide a glimmer of hope for soldiers suffering with the condition, but with the stigma and disbelief the general public has regarding the disorder, the battle is far from over.

Genetic Markers and Immune Response Reveal Origins of PTSD

While Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has become highly stigmatized as a mental health condition within the armed forces, where soldiers often return home from battle with the debilitating condition, it appears that not only may some soldiers be genetically predisposed to it—some may have immunological reactions that even make it worse. In a new study published this week in the journal Molecular Psychiatry, a team of researchers with the University of Southampton (UK) and University of California, San Diego have uncovered the genetic markers that could theoretically allow them to identify soldiers or patients that may be most at risk, even before they’re deployed at all.
Sperm and Egg

The One-In-A-Million Birth, Genetically Identical Triplets Born In Montana

When Montana couple, Jodey and Jase Kinsey, gave birth to triplets earlier this week, the two young parents were overjoyed. But soon after the births of their three healthy boys in the delivery room, they soon learned that they struck the biologic lottery, scoring a genetic jackpot if you will. The newly born boys Ian, Milo, and Cade, are all genetically identical brothers, representing a one-in-a-million birth.
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