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The Trump Administration Proposes Steep Budget Cut For NOAA, By 17 Percent

By Ankan sarkar | Mar 06, 2017 08:58 AM EST

The Trump administration is planning to undercut the budget of United States’s premier climate science agency, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) by 17 percent. NOAA which is one of the top U.S. climate science agencies monitors and predicts all kind of climate data including tides, storms, and rains.

Besides weather reporting, NOAA also monitors climate changing effects on coastlines, glaciers, oceans and land. Their advanced satellite system helps people by saying when it’s safe to drive a car, fly a plane or steer a sheep. This year, the Trump administration is preparing to slash the agency's budget. if their plan gets approved then NOAA have to dial back or pause some of their work.

According to the four-page budget memo by The Washington Post, The White House is aiming to cut 17 percent of NOAA’s annual budget. As per the latest budget plan, NOAA’s Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research department would lose 26 percent (~$216 million) and the satellite division would lose $513 million, or 22 percent of fund of their current annual budget.

Meteorologist J. Marshall Shepherd from the University of Georgia and leading climate expert at NOAA, said in a statement,“Any weakening of our technological, scientific and human capabilities related to weather and climate places American lives and property at risk”. Meteorologists reported at Mashable that it will be a difficult job without reliable, advanced weather satellites.

Those weather forecasting satellites supply about 90 percent of information which includes daily weather data, storm predictions like Hurricanes and Tornadoes. Retired vice admiral of NOAA, Conrad Lautenbacher defined Trump's budget proposal as ill-timed, given the needs of society, military and economy.

Lautenbacher also explained that It will be very hard to manage and maintain required service for the country. Later This year, NOAA has a plan to launch their next-generation, multibillion-dollar satellites. But, these budget cuts are now causing delays in satellite production and deployment that would make weather forecasts less reliable.

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