Feb 17, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

From Discovery Of Exoplanets To Archeology - Here’s How Citizen Science Can Change The World

Apr 17, 2017 07:55 AM EDT

Newer technologies, speedy communication, and imagination - these are the things that help everyday people discover what scientists sometimes can't. It is surprising what a small amount of curiosity and passion can bring.

Citizen science is a research which has been conducted by the public whose primary goal is to not only gather data and evidence but to come to a conclusive statement about any aspect of science. This branch of research, which is a fairly new concept has started to revolutionize at the time when connectivity began to influence everyday life strongly.

A few notable contributions of the public, or citizen science, to scientific discovery, include astronomy and archaeology. A report from Phys Org has explained that an amateur astronomer has discovered not only an exoplanet but an exoplanet system earlier this month.

This new discovery has encouraged viewers and other amateur scientists all over the world to try to look for more information and more signs of bodies in space. What is most interesting about this is that the discovery needed no professional support, no billion-dollar equipment, and no funding - just pure curiosity.

In 2015, at the time when Google Earth just started to make a dent in the world of netizens, an article from Discover Magazine discussed how the app has started a revolution in Archaeology. An amateur archaeologist, or citizen scientist, came about a Google Earth image of a field indicative of medieval-era plowing. By trying out to detect metal within the area, he has discovered one of the largest hoards of 11th-century coins in history. Its total value amounts to roughly $1.5 million.

Citizen science and technology has changed how much the public can contribute to scientific and historical discovery. With all the information available on the internet, a simple man from his home can learn a variety of things experts may have taken years to study - depending on one's resourcefulness.

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