Feb 21, 2018 | Updated: 09:54 AM EDT

First Ever Self-Sailing Electric Cargo Ship To Sail By 2019: Reduces NOx & CO2 Pollutants

May 12, 2017 01:42 AM EDT

In order to save 40,000 truck journeys per year Yara International with the help of an industrial league plan to launch the first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship. According to reports, this first autonomous vessel will start operating by 2019.

In a report released by Phys Org, the first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship is to expect to manned at first and will have the complete operation a year after. This first autonomous vessel has a 65 nautical miles that can carry hundreds of fertilizers with a speed of 12 to 15 miles per hour.

The first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship will transport hundreds of fertilizer in three ports in Southern Norway. Svein Tore Holsether, CEO of Yara International explained that this first autonomous vessel will take off the weight of the noise during the transportation as there are 100 diesel trucks used to haul fertilizer products from plant to ports.

Holsether also added that the advantage of this first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship is that it will cut down oxides of nitrogen (NOx) or carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. While according to research in Automotive World, these chemicals are hazardous to human's health as it will cause diseases like chest pain, impaired vision, and coordination, dizziness, headaches, and nausea.

On that account, the team from Yara International believed that this first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship will help to save humanity and environment. In fact, this first autonomous vessel will wind down 678 tons of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) or carbon dioxide (CO2) per year.

As of now, Norway is one of the major producers of oil in the world and also considered to be one of the countries that adopted electric vehicles for convenience. Hence, this first ever self-sailing electric cargo ship powered with batteries will make transportation in the country a lot easier.

©2017 ScienceTimes.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission. The window to the world of science times.
Real Time Analytics