Oct 18, 2018 | Updated: 04:34 PM EDT

Hubble Telescope Captured The Shining Stars Of Sagittarius

Feb 16, 2017 01:15 AM EST

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The Hubble Telescope has been providing space enthusiasts glimpses of the beauty from the outside for years. And guess what? It was able to capture a very rare photo of the constellation Sagittarius which featured the beauty of its glittering stars.

On February 13, Space wrote that the said photo by the Hubble Telescope captured the intricate details of Sagittarius which is also known as "The Archer". As if the stars are twinkling live, scientists informed the public that these twinkling details in the photo are called diffraction spikes. Diffraction is actually the process where the light beams are spread out through a narrow aperture which then produces waves that we actually see with our eyes.

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration or NASA also further imparted that these cross-like details formed in the photo are not due to any disturbances in the atmosphere. Instead, they shared that the said effect was due to the Hubble Telescope itself which uses mirrors that diffract light.

In the official post by NASAthey further explained the details in the photo. They explained the meanings of the colors of the stars present in the photo. Most stars in the Sagittarius constellation exhibited shades of blue and white which are actually deemed to be the hottest stars. NASA also admitted that they also did some modifications in the photo just to enhance its color but they did no alteration to the image details.

Aside from this unique photo of the Sagittarius constellation, the Hubble Telescope has long been in the history of capturing images for astronomers. The Hubble Telescope was actually a joint project in 1990 between two space giants, the NASA and the European Space Agency or the ESA. Since its launch, the Hubble Telescope has been part of more than 1.3 million space observations which benefited our space explorations a lot

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