Ryan Wallace

Apple Watch

Apple May Be Tabling Health-Monitoring from its Watch, But It’ll Still Pack a Punch

Medicine & Technology While other wearable tech may be ahead of the curve, Apple continues to miss the mark when it comes to the development of its upcoming watch. While other models offered by competitors boast the ability to monitor heart-rate, amongst a myriad of other important vitals, Apple has announced that they are scrapping the health-monitoring tech from its upcoming product on account of problems with sensors and their regulators.

Superbug Breaks Out at UCLA Medical Center, Causing Concern for Safety of Endoscopic Procedures

While all may seem fine in endoscopic outpatient procedures, with an easy check-in and virtually no down-time at all, it turns out that an antibiotic-resistant superbug may be waiting in the OR. Health officials with the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention and the California health department are on high alert this week as news of two deaths in a local Los Angeles hospital have researchers wondering whether the superbug will claim more lives in its wake.

Leave it to the Limpets—Researchers Find New Strongest Natural Material On Earth

If you’ve ever been pulled out to sea by a riptide you know the true power of the oceans. When a tide changes, waves can crash down on the shores with immense power, and if you’re destined to live on these shores you’d obviously have to endure a lot. And in a new study published this week in the journal of the Royal Society Interface, researchers from the University of Portsmouth and the Queen Mary University of London are revealing just how much.
A colorized transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Ebola virus virion

When It Comes to Pandemics and Outbreaks, Could Climate Change Be to Blame?

While many factors play into the development of a viral or bacterial outbreak, including herd immunity and preexisting healthcare practices, current outbreaks of the Ebola virus and the measles have many wondering exactly what’s causing the reemergence of such lethal diseases. Well, the obvious answers of vaccinations and poor sanitation conditions are readily available, but many may not consider an even more significant culprit—climate change.
Mali records new Ebola case, linked to dead nurse

When It Comes to Pandemics and Outbreaks, Could Climate Change Be to Blame?

While many factors play into the development of a viral or bacterial outbreak, including herd immunity and preexisting healthcare practices, current outbreaks of the Ebola virus and the measles have many wondering exactly what’s causing the reemergence of such lethal diseases. Well, the obvious answers of vaccinations and poor sanitation conditions are readily available, but many may not consider an even more significant culprit—climate change.

Researchers Find How Acidified Oceans Have Become with Help of NASA and ESA Satellites

While many argue that the fight against greenhouse gases is long over, climatologists and ecologists continue to urge that the battle continues on. And while the culprits are all the same, the problems with these remnants of burning fossil fuels are taking on new problems. A topic of major research has developed from these changes and now researchers are quantify just how it will impact our world in the years to come.

Ash, Auroras or Clouds—What Could this Strange Martian Plume Be?

Covered round-the-clock by rovers and orbiters, researchers know a lot about Mars and its vast desolate plains. Yet, some mysteries remain. Of course, researchers with major space agencies continue to look for evidence of life and of conditions hospitable to support possible manned missions, but even more so researchers are interested in the anomalies above the surface.
Adelie penguins

Life in The Cold—How Penguins Deal Without Sweet & Savory Sensations

What could be worse than living on a frozen tundra, you ask? Experiencing the world in only two tastes has got to be pretty rough. And when you’re noshing down on fish day in and day out, only being able to taste things that are salty or sour has got to be a bummer too. But sadly, this is the life of the penguin.

Duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton Marks the Start of Children’s Mental Health Week with a Call to Action

During a visit to Bethlem and Maudsley School last week, the Duchess of Cambridge, Kate Middleton recorded a call to action video released today to mark the start of Children’s Mental Health Week. The campaign, which seeks to combat stigma against mental health services, is led by the Place2Be children’s charity in the UK. And this year the message comes in light of new studies which reveal that a third of parents would feel embarrassed if their 15 to 18-year-olds sought mental health from counselors at their schools.
Titan Submersible

VIDEO—How Antiquated Technology May Reveal the Secrets of Titan’s Seas

Beneath the glaring surface and choppy waves, many secrets are hidden here in the oceans of Earth. The vast depths hide species unknown to men, lost treasures at the seafloor and perhaps even a cryptid or two. And while terrestrial studies of planets may have been interesting in the 20th century, space agencies are looking to aquatic surveys which may one day reveal the origins of life even farther out in space.
HIV Infection Electron Micrograph

New HIV Strain in Cuba Has Researchers Rushing to Stop Fast Progression of AIDS

In a new study published in the journal EBioMedicine, researchers with Belgium’s University of Leuvan report the discovery of a new strain of HIV which may prove to be far more lethal to patients in the West. Originally found in patients in Cuba, the new strain poses particular threats to those infected with HIV as it can develop into AIDS within three years of infection. Though efforts have significantly lowered the infection rates of HIV, as well as prolonged lives with the help of antiretroviral drugs, researchers fear that the fast-moving virus may advance too quickly to treat.

Healthcare Workers Attacked in Guinea as Locals Give Ebola the Upper Hand

In light of news that healthcare workers with the Red Cross planned to disinfect a local school infected with Ebola, crowds of central Guinean residents attacked an Ebola facility and healthcare workers, government officials reported Saturday, Feb. 14. Though the healthcare workers continue to try to fight and contain the disease, local uprisings have interfered greatly with their work in the field. And government officials are saying that the counterproductive actions of locals are forcefully giving the Ebola virus the upper hand.
Catherine Coleman Expedition 26

Valentine’s Day In Space—A Promise to Better Heart Health

When better than Valentine’s Day to discuss matters of the heart? As February happens to be American Heart Month, dedicated to heart health and the physical fitness of everyone around the world, it seems that NASA and astronauts aboard the International Space Station are taking the promise of heart health to new heights. A new year, a new crew, and a new attitude has come aboard the International Space Station, and this time they’re vowing to keep their hearts just as healthy as their minds and our thirst for knowledge in space exploration.

ESA Mars Express Orbiter Reveals Place for Caffè on Mars’ Southern Icecap

Thanks to some clever innovation, and one determined Italian astronaut currently stationed aboard the International Space Station, espresso and aroma of dark-roasted coffee beans has finally reached outer space. But what about the far off planet of Mars? Though the planet may be desolate, and according to current reports, completely absent of life, a new image released by the European Space Agency (ESA) looks like the red planet may have a place for caffè.
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