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A recent study from Duke University reveals the impact of hydraulic fracturing in West Virginia water reserve. The study shows that although the practice does not affect the ground water, but it contaminates  the river and other surface water stream

The hydraulic fracturing process, or fracking, in West Virginia is conducted in the Marcellus Shale rock formation, in the northwest West Virginia. The area is known to be rich in natural gas reserved, but it has been criticized for its environmental impact to water reserve. However, a recent study from Duke University shows that fracking does not impact groundwater reserve, as reported by Fox News.

The study is a peer-reviewed study, which according to the Duke University press release, the study finds that fracking does not endanger the ground water but its wastewater treatment is harmful to the surface water stream. The team of researchers was led by the professor of geochemistry and water quality at Duke University's Nicholas School of the Environment, Avner Vengosh.

“Based on consistent evidence from comprehensive testing," Professor Vengosh said. "We found no indication of groundwater contamination over the three-year course of our study”

In the study, the Duke University team collaborated with other researchers from Ohio State University, Pennsylvania State University, Stanford University and the French Geological Survey. The team took the sample from 112 drinking well across northwest West Virginia for three years. The research has found that the argument from the environmentalists who oppose the fracking process about its negative impact on water reserve is not proven.

Although the three years study shows that process of fracking does not endanger the water reserve, but it affects the water stream. It is because the hydraulic fracturing process generates a wastewater as a result of its process to inject a high-pressure water into the rock to fracture it and force it to release the natural gas. Watch the animated video, explaining the fracking process below: