air pollution

The busy street of Beijing

Pollution in China

The increasing death incidence of China due to air pollution is wearisome; thus, immediate solution should be given a priority.

Strict Pollution Regulations Around Beijing Olympics Produced Bigger Babies

Thanks to the 2008 Beijing Olympics, China may find another generation of star athletes on its hand. No, it’s not thanks to the facilities or the experience of bringing together the world’s best athletes in its large port-city—rather it has everything to do with the pollution around the event. Researchers are aware of the fact that high levels of air pollution can significantly impact fetal growth and development, and when it comes to air pollution few nations are quite as bad as China. But with the arrival of the 2008 Beijing Olympics and mandates reducing pollution levels courtesy of the Chinese government, researchers were given the perfect setup for a case study. And what they happened to find is that children born from mothers pregnant during the games had higher birth weights than those born before or after the games.

How Toxic is LA's Air? Should You Fear For What's Happening to Your Brain?

We all know the dangers of air pollution. But studies have shown that air pollution could affect more than just your respiratory system. Past studies have shown that extended exposure especially in urban environments can increase the risk of autism in unborn children, and, in a new study, could even cause your brain to shrink over time.

Can the Air You Breathe Cause Your Brain to Shrink?

According to a new study published this week in the journal Stroke, researchers found the first link directly correlating changes in brain volume to exposure to air pollution, and during the 10-year monitoring period found that brains exposed to areas of dense air pollution were smaller leading to poorer cognitive function—poorer thinking and memory problems just being the start.

Paris Shuts Down Traffic in the City, Saving Babies In the Process

In light of thick smog choking the nation’s capital, France shut down half of the traffic in Paris this week in hopes of mitigating surmounting toxins and pollutants in the air, caused as a byproduct of motor vehicles. But in the process of untarnishing the facade of the “City of Lights” it appears that French officials may also be saving the next generation of French citizens as well.

Finding Bright Solutions to Smog in the ‘City of Lights’

Can’t find the Eiffel Tower? It appears that most of Paris is choking on a thick smog that is plaguing most of northern France. In recent months French authorities have claimed that major cities in northern France, such as Paris, have been contributing greatly to an ever-growing problem of air pollution in the area. So in order to combat the haze of smog, French officials are coming up with a bright solution to save the tarnished facade of the “City of Lights”.

Finding Bright Solutions to Smog in the ‘City of Lights’

Can’t find the Eiffel Tower? It appears that most of Paris is choking on a thick smog that is plaguing most of northern France. In recent months French authorities have claimed that major cities in northern France, such as Paris, have been contributing greatly to an ever-growing problem of air pollution in the area. So in order to combat the haze of smog, French officials are coming up with a bright solution to save the tarnished facade of the “City of Lights”.

China Seeks Cleaner Air Without an Environmental Movement

China's latest stance on the environment can be called contradictory even for them. A powerful documentary on air pollution, produced with official support, went viral after it was released online only to be blocked and wiped clean on the Chinese Internet by the government days later. Then, President Xi Jinping vowed to punish "violators" who damage the environment "with an iron hand" and Premier Li Keqiang calling pollution "a blight on people's quality of life" and promising significant cuts in emissions.
Tropical Rain Forest

NASA Says Tropical Rainforests May Hold a Key To the Climate Change Issue

While tropical rainforests may be vanishing, a new study led by NASA researchers reveals yet another reason why trees in the tropical rainforest may in fact be man’s best friend. With greenhouse gas emissions on a constant rise since the dawning of the industrial revolution and the subsequent population growth that followed, researchers in recent years have tried to estimate exactly how much carbon dioxide is actually absorbed by plants to better assess a serious global issue. And in a new NASA-led study, researchers from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory were able to combine three different divisions of science to reveal that tropical rainforests may be absorbing far more CO2 than many researchers previously thought, in response to rising atmospheric levels of the greenhouse gas.
Floating Plastic in the Ocean

Plastic Pollution Causes ‘Tons’ of Problems as New Estimates Reveal Litter on the Rise

While the biochemistry of the world’s oceans may be a complex study, with a myriad of variants, researchers are certain of one simple fact—man-made plastics do not belong in the oceans. And the pollution of our oceans is far more vast than the world would like to admit. But in a new study recently published in this week’s issue of the journal PLOS ONE researchers are saying that the Earth’s oceans may contain more than 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic particulates, weighing nearly 270,000 tons combined which is far larger than previous studies ever estimated the pollution to be.
Global Warming a 'Myth' Says Weather Channel Co-Founder

Video: Global Warming a Myth Says Weather Channel Co-Founder

John Coleman, meteorologist and co-founder of the Weather Channel recently appeared on Fox News to reiterate his belief that man-made climate change is not only not happening, but those who claim the contrary are doing so based on "bad science."
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