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Both teens and adults who have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD are more likely to smoke cigarettes and turn nicotine-dependent compared to their peers without ADHD.

According to a Verywell Mind report, youngsters are also more likely to begin smoking at such an early age. They have a more challenging time quitting the habit successfully compared to the general populace.

This is evidently a public health concern as the regular use of cigarettes is linked to a host of adverse health effects. Additionally, for many people, cigarettes can be an access to the use of the drug.

Youngsters must know the dangers of using any tobacco type, whether to date or in the future. Exposure to nicotine while young can be harmful to the development of the adolescent brain and can result in a lifetime of addiction to nicotine or tobacco use.

According to the American Cancer Society, exposure to nicotine can prime the adolescent brain and addiction, as well as other drugs.

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Science Times - ADHD in Teens Linked to Smoking: What's Triggering These Youngsters to Smoke More Frequently and How to Stop Them From Doing So?
(Photo: Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)
Both teens and adults who have attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder or ADHD are more likely to smoke cigarettes and turn nicotine-dependent compared to their peers without the condition.

What Triggers Smoking in Teens and How to Stop Them

Mid-Day report said smoking is a habit that's damaging for people regardless of age. For the youths, it starts as fun, turns into a habit, and later on, an addiction.

There are several trigger points such as peer pressure, which associates smoking with maturity and independence, or simply the urge to try out new things the youths consider as "adventures" in life.

There are various effective ways parents can try to prevent their children from getting into this lifetime addiction. Here are five of them:

1. Teach Them to Say 'No'

When children enter their teenage years, peer pressure is at its maximum, and most of these kids surrender to this.

Parents should sit with their kids and encourage and teach them to say "no" each time they are asked to smoke. As a parent, a mother or father can even practice with the child saying, "Sorry, I don't smoke."

2. Discuss the Habit

It helps when parents discuss things about smoking with their children in a friendly manner. They can probably begin by asking the child how much they know about smoking to make the latter aware that smoking is hazardous to them.

3. Put Emphasis on the Health Impacts

Many teens think vaping or e-cigarettes, and other famously used approaches such as candy cigarettes, among others, are safe.

Children and teenage individuals need to be mindful of the contrary. Parents must discuss the serious health problems that can arise from smoking, preferably citing real-life examples.

Importantly, parents should make their children understand the harmful impacts of passive smoking, and they should avoid going to places where people smoke.

4. Educate the Child that Even Just a Single Cigarette can be Harmful

Make the children understand that even just one cigarette can get them addicted to smoking. Therefore, even attempting just for fun may result in a habit for a lifetime.

Tell the children that most adult smokers begin smoking as teens, and for them, quitting is undoubtedly and undeniably a tough job.

5. Be a Role Model

For smoking parents, it is advised that you quit the habit and be a role model to your children. It is also advised that you make them understand your smoking-related challenges.

Also, do not keep any smoking-related products or objects at home which your kids can easily access. They might get tempted to try it out because of curiosity.

Related information about ADHD and smoking is shown on AttentionTalkVideo's YouTube video below:

 

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